Mr Macs fat attack

Discussion in 'Training Logs' started by Mr mac, Jan 6, 2015.

  1. Mr mac

    Mr mac TM Health & Safety officer Top Contributor

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    ok I'm signed in for the transformation contest. I went in last time but work and other things along with my head being all over the place meant I bombed out and actually ate worse leading up to and all over Christmas. The last contest did however highlight that I can easily waste a lot of time and not be productive. That comp was almost 1/4 year and it flew by.

    I'm more focused now new year and all that and technically should have no excuses.

    So here's the plan
    Fortitude style training slightly tweaked so body parts 3 times per week with exception of legs which will be twice as knees are not great.

    2 sled pull prowler or weighted vest sessions per week to start for the first 4 weeks to hopefully kick start fat loss along with diet tweaks.
    Diet will be carbs on weight training days only. Intra post and another. All other times will be protein fats veggies or salads. Will try to do at least one just lean protein meal and veg per day fish chicken etc.
    After some excellent advice from @Righty I'm looking naturally to lose 1lb a week steady nothing drastic. The comp is more of a way of me being focused And sticking with it for 12 weeks than thoughts of how well I might place.
     
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  2. Mr mac

    Mr mac TM Health & Safety officer Top Contributor

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    Day 1 sled pulls done
    Slippy as hell in the field but pulled 75lb sled continuous for 10mins.
    Not bad start and will slowly increase this as well over the weeks. Great for extra concentric leg work without the recovery issues.

    Slow and steady
     
  3. Cyborg

    Cyborg Top Contributor

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    Good luck with this :)

    How much overall do you guessimate you need to lose?
     
  4. Mr mac

    Mr mac TM Health & Safety officer Top Contributor

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    Thanks
    I'm thinking a stone would have me much tighter if it's controlled hence the lb a week for this comp. I think I'll be happy if I drop that and it's 85-90% fat and water that's dropped
     
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  5. Northern Lass

    Northern Lass Top Contributor

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    Subbed Mr Big Mac :D
     
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  6. Olly

    Olly Formerly legranderic Top Contributor

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    in for this as well fellow transformer
     
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  7. TheProducer

    TheProducer Top Contributor

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    In on this mate.
     
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  8. Mr mac

    Mr mac TM Health & Safety officer Top Contributor

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    Thanks for the replies thus far. I actually know if I keep the journal I can again look back to make sure I'm not letting it slip.
    I have a natural tendency to go at things like a bull in a china shop try to drastic diet and then few weeks in totally screw with my head and reverse it to bulking. Got to forget the mind games.
    Goodbye daily easy to eat yummy carbs I will miss thee
     
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  9. Mr mac

    Mr mac TM Health & Safety officer Top Contributor

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    I felt this post was a good reminder to myself

    Conditioning 101
    by Jim Wendler
    There's no acceptable reason for being an out of shape lard-ass. Being in shape requires one thing: hard work. Here's a list of some of the conditioning activities I've done along with the pros and cons of each.
    Prowler
    While simple by design, the Prowler is one of the most effective conditioning tools an athlete can have. Any level of athlete, regardless of training level or sport, can use it. The best thing about the Prowler is the "hard" level of conditioning it can produce with minimal wear and tear on the body. It's very easy on the knees, hips, and ankles, making it great for older strength athletes.
    For younger athletes, it's a great way to build the lungs and legs/hips with minimal coaching; just load up some weight and push. It doesn't require the technicality of a squat or the constant coaching of the deadlift.
    The Prowler also offers a quick and efficient workout. A Prowler eliminates 60-minute conditioning sessions. In less than 20 minutes, an athlete can push his way to burning lungs and legs. This is a huge plus for the lifter that doesn't have a great deal of time to train.
    The Prowler also allows you to change weights and distances with ease; a stronger, bigger lifter can load the Prowler and use it along side a weaker, smaller, lifter. This makes it applicable to any size, strength, and conditioning level, a huge plus for personal trainers working with a large variety of clients.
    The two biggest drawbacks of the Prowler are the price and the difficulty of "prescribing" a workout. Because the Prowler can be pushed on a wide variety of surfaces (cement, concrete, grass, or turf) that all vary greatly in drag coefficient, it's hard for any fitness professional to accurately say what weight and distance to push.
    People who own the Prowler may have only one surface to push on (for example, the street in front of their house) and this surface may be much harder or easier than what a prescribed workout was based upon. Thus, a Prowler requires some intelligent thinking of its owner, which can be a tall order, especially in the strength-training world.
    Hill Sprints
    Hill sprints are simply brutal. The legs and lungs are taxed heavily if the hill is steep and long enough. Because I grew up in the Chicago area, Walter Payton was a huge influence on me, and his use of hill running to prepare his mind and body for the rigors of the upcoming NFL season made any Illinois kid want to run hills. I'm sure his off-season regimen was partly responsible for his legendary strength and durability.
    Anyone who's ever run hill sprints knows the mental strength it can develop – even more so than a Prowler. There's something very primal about lacing up your cleats and attacking a large hill for a training session.
    Of course, the big drawback of running hill sprints is finding a decent hill. Many lifters live in flat, barren areas where there isn't a hill bigger than a speed bump. And those that do live in hilly areas may find it difficult to find one that has a good enough surface to run on. So hill sprints, while extremely effective, have enormous geographical limitations.
    The other drawback to hill sprints is the wear and tear on the ankles and Achilles. If you're new to running or are trying to reclaim lost glory like yours truly, make sure you take the necessary steps to stretch and prepare before attacking the hill.
    For those that want to find a hill, Google Maps is your friend; I highly recommend looking for sledding hills and reservoirs. These two places are prime areas for some steep hills.
    Prescribing a hill sprint workout is much harder than prescribing a Prowler workout. There's no standard hill length or grade so the athlete is going to have to use his best judgment. As with anything in weight training, set a small, reachable goal the first time out and build slowly.
    Jump Rope
    The jump rope is a great way to warm-up the body and hit some basic conditioning work. It's great for your feet and agility, and I always feel more "athletic" after I've jumped rope for a training cycle.
    As a warm-up, I used the jump rope for 500+ jumps before training in high school. This was mainly used with double foot and single foot jumps and was followed by a thorough stretching session.
    And if you don't have time to warm-up, you don't have time to work out. Of all the different warm-up options, this is the most efficient way to get the heart rate up and get some sort of athletic benefit.
    There are two drawbacks to jumping rope. First, not everyone can do it. I learned this when I was personal training and saw way too many people trip over the rope or receive a stinging whip from an errant jump. Simply working on technique and slowing down the jumps can solve this problem.
    The second drawback is shin splints. In college, I used to jump rope in my apartment and after several weeks of 1000+ jumps/day, I suffered from a nasty bout of shin splints. Despite these things, the jump rope can be used very effectively for conditioning during the workout. After you perform the main lift of the day, use the jump rope between assistance lifts.
    This allows you to get your main lifts in without sacrificing the strength portion of your training, along with getting your conditioning in while doing your assistance work. This is optimal for people who have minimal equipment, especially during the winter when the weather won't allow you to get outside. It's also a great way to maximize your time in the weight room.
    Stadium Steps
    One of the hardest workouts I've ever done was running up the press box side of the University of Arizona stadium. The steps get steeper as you go farther and your legs and lungs are on fire. I remember walking back to my car and my legs shaking like a young Elvis. Very humbling.
    Like hill sprints, stadium steps build the legs and lungs to a high degree, but also like hill sprints, the area you live in and the size of the stadium largely limit you. Also, the stadiums near your home may not be open to the public. However, if you can get in, do yourself a favor and run stadium steps.
    Stadium steps are also easier on the ankles than hill sprints. And like hill sprints and the Prowler, they're very knee friendly as the vertical distance of the footfall is much less than running on flat surface.
    For people living in big cities, running stairs is a much easier option. Apartment and office buildings have huge amounts of stairs that can be used and abused.
    Weighted Vest
    The first time I used a weighted vest I was surprised at how much it affected my low back and traps. I thought my lungs would be the first to go but by the end of the walk, my back and traps were screaming. I've used the weight vest on walks around my neighborhood and the hill I sprint. For the hill, I did not run with the weight vest on, I simply walked up the hill. This killed my legs.
    The weight vest is a great way to turn simple tasks, like walking, into something very difficult. We all have access to the outdoors and thus have access to someplace to walk (and I'm not talking about a treadmill).
    Add in the low back and trap development one can get from using a heavy weight vest and you have a tremendous conditioning resource. Also, weight vest walks can be done any time of year, unless you're living in blizzard conditions year round.
    I think the weight vest is a great option for older lifters that don't want to be bored by traditional cardio equipment. It's also easy on the body (meaning your knees aren't pounded), yet still requires enough effort and strength to make it challenging and not feel like you're "just taking a stroll." I recommend using the weight vest for distance (e.g., walk for 1 or 2 miles) rather than time.
    The drawback to the weight vest is the price. Like the Prowler, it's out of many lifters' budgets. And there's a big difference between using a well-designed weight vest and a backpack stuffed with weights and textbooks.
    Body Weight Conditioning
    A. Jumping Jacks, 30 seconds
    B. Mountain Climbers, 30 seconds
    C. Burpees, 30 seconds
    D. Split Squat Jump, 30 seconds
    Don't be fooled, this is a brutal workout. With people that have limited space and funds, this is a great conditioning alternative. This is also great for when the weather won't allow you to get out and stretch your legs.
    There are two drawbacks. The first is that it's a very short workout, something that can be remedied by longer rest periods, more exercises, more reps, and more sets. Suffice it to say, doing these exercises as listed above isn't easy, especially for those who carry more muscle.
    Second, of all the conditioning stuff I've done, this is by far the most boring. That may be my personal opinion but I'd much rather run hills or push a Prowler.
    Feel free to mix and match exercises, time, and rest periods with body weight conditioning, but remember that there's no need to get too fancy. Simple is always best.
    Incline Treadmill Sprints
    This is by far my favorite winter conditioning tool. Since most people train in commercial gyms, it's very easy to prescribe. Running treadmill sprints is also easy to do.
    •Turn on treadmill.
    •Ramp up the incline as far as it can go.
    •Start at 6 miles/hour.
    •Run for 15 seconds.
    •Hop off treadmill (feet on the sides of the belt) and rest for 45 seconds. During the rest period increase speed .5 mph.
    •Repeat until you get to a speed that is challenging for you.
    •Do this 20-30 times.
    Incline treadmill sprints have a great built in warm-up (starting at a lower speed) and allow you to adjust the speed for your conditioning and speed level. It's very easy on the knees and hard on the lungs. Plus, you can do more work in 20 minutes than people who fart around for an hour.
    Sled Pulling
    Sled dragging is terribly simple – hook a sled up to your lifting belt or harness and walk forwards or backwards. You can add more weight and pull for shorter distance or use less weight and go for time. Jim Hoskinson used one-mile sled drags to rehab a very bad knee injury and returned to the platform for some very strong lifts.
    I like hooking up a 100-foot rope to a sled and pulling it hand-over-hand. This is a great compliment to your regular conditioning (which is usually centered around the lower body). This is also great for the upper back and lats, and provided the rope is thick enough, will tax your grip and arms, too.
    While standard sled dragging (forward/back) has fallen out of favor due to the popularity of the Prowler, it's still a great conditioning and strength tool, especially for younger lifters. Like the Prowler, it doesn't require much skill to walk forward or backward.
    - Jim Wendler
    Want more? Check out Jim's exclusive 5/3/1 workouts here: http://www.t-nation.com/workouts/beyond-531-program-1-1
    ‪#‎BeUnbreakable‬ ‪#‎Biotest‬ ‪#‎JimWendler‬

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  10. TinyTim

    TinyTim Timothy Sprague-Dawley Top Contributor

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    In.
    Burn all pasties and cakes with fire.
    Clean food for the win.
    :D
     
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  11. Mr mac

    Mr mac TM Health & Safety officer Top Contributor

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    Appreciated and I will be checking in with you regularly. I know you didn't ask me to but I've appointed you my sponsor. Like some drug addict AA type thing. I will be sending you questions at 2am asking if I can have porridge yet
     
  12. TheProducer

    TheProducer Top Contributor

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    I believe wendlers conditioning 101 is basically move whilst holding onto something heavy. Keeps it simple haha
     
  13. TinyTim

    TinyTim Timothy Sprague-Dawley Top Contributor

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    You can have porridge when the temperature of the universe hits absolute zero.
    Glad you've appointed me your agony aunt.
    Don't know how I could get through the day without the pleasure.
    :D
     
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  14. TinyTim

    TinyTim Timothy Sprague-Dawley Top Contributor

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    Like the 1am dance in a nightclub then.
    :D
     
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  15. Mr mac

    Mr mac TM Health & Safety officer Top Contributor

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    Ok pretty good session
    I'm doing varied rep range throughout the week
    Today and fri 13-15 reps
    Low cable row x 4 back felt very pumped and tight despite the no carbs
    Dips 4 started weighted but last set body weight 10+3
    Nautilus arm curl 3 as I often feel bicep work in delts more I prefer machines good pump
    Seated calf 4x20
    Plank 1 min. Done
    Now looking forward to my 2 carb meals.
     
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